Project Euler

I’ve become an active member of Project Euler (PE) again. Project Euler (www.projecteuler.net) is a collection of (around 300 or so) mathematical and programmatical problems. I’m not sure when I started the first time, but it’s been a couple of years, I think. Now I’m back again with a bit more knowledge and feeling a bit more comfortable with programming, several programming and math courses later.

When I first joined, I was mostly only comfortable with Java as my programming language of choice, but I’m very interested in learning to program comfortably in C for a few reasons:

  • It is the traditional language in Unix/Linux applications.
  • I like GNU/Linux and Free and Open-Source Software.
  • It is a lot faster than Java… but still has very similar syntax!
  • I like handling pointers for some reason. I feel like I’m much more in contact with the data as I have full control of everything. It’s just so gratifying to get Segmentation Fault after Segmentation Fault and then, after some debugging and messing around with my pointers, finally getting the sought output from the program.

I don’t believe it’s mandatory to join Project Euler to take part in the problems, but I recommend you sign up for an account, because if you do:

  • you can provide answers to the problems and Project Euler will keep track of the problems you’ve solved.
  • you may participate in the forum thread for a particular problem upon solving it, allowing you to discuss your solution with fellow members. (It’s incredible to find solutions written in the J and K programming languages, which afford extremely concise programming.) Note that only relatively recent forum threads are open to new posts, but all threads are open to read (upon solving the corresponding problem, as I already mentioned).

Project Euler is a very fine tool to learn a programming language. If you’re not a programmer by profession and you don’t really have any software needs that aren’t fulfilled, Project Euler provides you with a great environment to experiment with a programming language’s syntax and libraries with problems and tasks to solve and complete.

My goal right now is to solve as many problems as I can using only the standard libraries in the GNU Library (glibc), namely stdlib, stdio and occasionally string (so far I’ve used string only for the strlen function, which I felt was unnecessary to write myself). It’s going pretty well, and it’s kind of fun to have to figure out solutions on your own instead of relying on already-written functions to do the job for you.

Some of the problems at PE can be solved only with the help of pen and paper, but most of them require up to thousands of iterations to find the solution and isn’t feasible without some computational aid. However, according to the site’s FAQ section, which they call “About”, all the problems are designed in a way that a well-constructed algorithm should take no more than 1 minute to output the solution to the problem. I’m very proud of C. Most problems finish in milliseconds, even on the super-slow laptop I use sometimes.

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